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Autumn - sunlitdays

sea_thoughts


The Sea of Stars

Water-stained pages, pebbles and traces of stardust


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The Shakespeare Code Review
Autumn - sunlitdays
sea_thoughts
Yes, it's an obvious cut line, but what can I say, it fits the episode perfectly.

Have to say that I wasn't too thrilled about this one at first. I liked the bit with the pretty (very pretty!) suitor and the girl, I thought they were on stage for a moment, which was what we were meant to think. I think. But then the bit where they all transformed into the hags and started ripping the flesh off his bones... bleh. Bit too cheesy for me, and I like a good bit of cheese usually (Manchego's my favourite).

My favourite bit about the episode? The way it didn't avoid the fact Martha's black. Okay, so the question about slaves was naive, but at least it showed that Martha has some sort of clue. Again, all of Will's names for her (I seriously hope the BBC doesn't get hate mail for that, but you never know) rang true, as did Martha's disbelief and the Doctor's embarrassment. Of course, Martha seemed strangely shocked given that she was prepared to be turned into a slave, but I can still excuse that on account of naivety and not having time travelled before. YAY, Martha actually listened to the Doctor and stopped talking Shakespearean! Technically, shouldn't the Tardis language translator account for the difference in English anyway?

I'm not sure if Bedlam would have actually looked like that in Elizabethan England, but it was still nice to actually see that side of Renaissance society and how the mentally ill were treated back then. I suppose some people would call Martha's outrage predictable, but that didn't make it any less real for me.

I really quite liked Will. In fact, all the Shakespeare references made me laugh, especially the Doctor's remark about the 35 academics and the one about 'rage against the dying of the light'. Plus, Martha's put down about his breath - the reality of personal hygiene was not ignored, thank God.

The bed scene. Poor Martha. And yet I really think Tennant was at his most Doctorish here, completely absorbed in the problem and completely unaware of how insensitive he was being to Martha. In fact, I saw a bit of Nine coming back there, but then Nine was aware of how insensitive he could be, he just didn't care. Ten really was oblivious. Under the circumstances, I thought Martha just blowing out the candle like that was quite restrained.

Great dramatic ending, I was on the edge of my seat. My only real peeve about this episode was the language: either go for completely modern or try and be a little formal, but don't mix, it sounds weird to my ear.

FACE OF BOE! God knows if we'll actually get anything out of him, but it will still be nice to see him again.

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Technically, shouldn't the Tardis language translator account for the difference in English anyway?

Yeah, that's what I was thinking. Otherwise if they work their way back to Chaucer I dunno if the companion would know what folk were saying. And the Doctor shushing her was a nice callback to Tooth & Claw.

Indeed it was, but at least he only had to shush Martha the once. And Martha didn't spend the rest of the episode trying to make Shakespeare say all his famous lines. /rant over

I ADORED the Harry Potter references! *squees*

And the bed scene, you are completely right, so very Doctorish. Like in School Reunion when he completely misses the possibility that Rose might be jealous, or in
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I ADORED the Harry Potter references! *squees*

And the bed scene, you are completely right, so very Doctorish. Like in <i>School Reunion</i> when he completely misses the possibility that Rose might be jealous, or in <Girl in the Fireplace</i> where he thinks that bringing Reinette on board would be a great idea. Not that they are insensitive, necessarily, just that he was too caught up in his stuff to contemplate what the others reactions will be.

I don't know if that makes any sense, I am a big pile of fangirl-goo at the minute. Yay for colliding fandoms!

Gah! Completely messed up HTML there. *hates not being able to edit comments*

That's okay. Thanks for reminding me about how he completely ignored Rose in Girl in the Fireplace, that's an excellent example.

My favourite bit about the episode? The way it didn't avoid the fact Martha's black. Okay, so the question about slaves was naive, but at least it showed that Martha has some sort of clue. Again, all of Will's names for her (I seriously hope the BBC doesn't get hate mail for that, but you never know) rang true, as did Martha's disbelief and the Doctor's embarrassment.

Yes, that was brilliant but I also liked the way culture and popular culture were used to short hand time-travel. I thought that worked exceptionally well.

Favourite line had to be 57 academics punching the air.

Fifty-seven... thirty-five... a lot of academics, anyway! ;)

Gareth Roberts has a much lighter hand than Russel to my mind. Which is rather sad.

I laughed all the harder at that line because that's exactly what I'd just done. Though I'm not an academic. I used to be, but I'm fine now.

Glad to see you're back among the living. ;)

Ha!

*grin* If you're curious to read a longer review/meta thing of mine that does mention the gorgeous Doctor/Will flirting feel free to pop on over to my LJ.

The cheesiness of the witches (and the lack of genuine in-story explanation for a lot of what was going on with them) was my only real sticking point with this episode.
Pertwee Who would almost certainly have come up with some 'race memory' explanation for the fact that they looked like panto witches, while even the McCoy era would've had some explanation for the broom-flying.
But, yeah, overall it was big fun - enough to let it get away with the kind of plotholes that might scupper a lesser story.

Yes. It would have been nice to have some explanation for the broomstick, especially since they took great pains to explain how everything Shakespeare said or did after this period was inspired by the Doctor and Martha.

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