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Spring - luna_ann

sea_thoughts


The Sea of Stars

Water-stained pages, pebbles and traces of stardust


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Theory Test
Spring - luna_ann
sea_thoughts
Passed my driving theory test yesterday! What a relief. Now all I have to do is pass the practical and I'm free and don't have to listen to my driving instructor. Also went to London to see Wreck-It Ralph (which FINALLY opened here last month) and really enjoyed it. Have to say that all the "duty" jokes will fly over the head of anyone who isn't American, though. I'm glad I went with my friend from California, who was able to explain the pun to me!


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Well, to be fair, like most things in the US, it varies by state. In PA, Driver's Ed is mandatory, yes, but its all bookwork. They hand you the state driving manual and you dissect every damn page of it. Which prepares you for the written exam. On your 16th birthday, you head to the licensing center where you take your written and eye exams and if you pass both of those, you get your learner's permit. After you have that for a minimum of SIX months, you take your driving test, get your Junior License which is like a real license except you have a midnight curfew. That's the mandatory bit. After you have your actual license, you go back to the high school and tell them you'd like your optional behind-the-wheel training. Which is a grand total of 10 hours. After you finish that, they give you a certificate which you can use for a discount on your car insurance and to apply for an amended license that lets you drive AFTER midnight, provided you have a clean driving record and you're 17 years old.

I think, in the rare but not unheard of event that an adult goes for their license for the first time, it's the basic same premise excepting the part about the Junior license.

That's PA. I know a lot of states let you get your permit when you're 15 and/or don't have a waiting restriction between permit and license and in some states behind-the-wheel is also mandatory school curriculum. And, this is all done at the teenager level, because, well, the US is not known for its public transport and its a spacey place so unless you live in NYC or Chicago, you are going nowhere if you're not driving yourself. Which explains why it's all part of required learning.

Edited at 2013-03-05 05:05 am (UTC)

I can understand why kids are allowed to drive earlier there, it's a big country and you're pretty stuck if you don't have your own vehicle. Thanks for the explanation, it's fascinating!

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